Palcohol

Could powdered alcohol be a thing in the future?

When talking about powdered food and drink, people tend to think of astronauts who spend prolonged periods of time in space living solely on a diet of powdered meals.

But believe it or not, powdered alcohol, or Palcohol, may have a future in our stores.

What is Powdered Alcohol?

Screen Shot 2014-04-23 at 12.06.59Image from palcohol.com

Basically powered alcohol is a powder that comes in little sugar-like packets. You simply put the powder into a glass and fill with whatever mixer you like.

Palcohol was invented by a man called Mark Phillips, an author and broadcaster, andat the beginning of April 2014 his product was approved by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax Trade Bureau (TTB) in America but they have now rejected the approval saying there was an ‘error’ and rescinded it.

In an interview with USA Today Phillips said: “There seemed to be a discrepancy on our fill level, how much powder is in the bag.” He also said that they would be resubmitting their label for approval.

Video from DNews YouTube channel 

Can You Snort It?

Critics have been saying that TTB later rejected the products because of the negativity it has been receiving. One of the most controversial statements, which the product was advertising on its original site, was that the consumer could drink or snort the powdered alcohol.

The site featured statements such as ‘Yes, you can snort it. And you’ll get drunk almost instantly.’ But after the bad publicity it changed it to Can I snort it? We have seen comments about goofballs wanting to snort it. Don’t do it!’.

If the product were to eventually be made legal in the States, it wouldn’t be too long before it made its way across the pond.

Even cocktails can come in powder form

Even cocktails can come in powder form

photo 2-3

Inevitably, some would be thrilled to be able to get rum, vodka and even cocktails such as cosmopolitans, mojitos and margaritas in little sachets (just like a sugar packet). This might meanno more lugging around large bottles of spirits but instead just add water or any mixer you want to the powder and Voila! you have yourself an alcoholic drink.

Jenny Toner, 22, who works in a bar in Newcastle says: “It sounds amazing. It would make life [behind a bar] so much easier. Instead of spending a few minutes making a complicated cocktail it would take seconds. When it’s busy it’s really annoying when someone orders a cocktail because it takes so long… this would be great for us.”

A survey done by EMDM shows that only 33% of people would by Palcohol if it was sold in shops

A survey done by EMDM shows that only 33% of people would by Palcohol if it was sold in shops

Even though this isn’t the first time that powdered alcohol has been talked about it could be joining the successes of jelly shots and alcopops. This may be the materialisation of powdered alcohol.

Where Did The Idea Come From?

The invention of Palcohol came after Mark Phillips, who likes to go on hikes, take bike rides and go camping, wanted to relax with an alcoholic beverage after these activities but didn’t want carry round the heavy bottles. He only wanted to carry water, thus then came the invention of Palcohol.

Zach Chapman, a barista, from Birmingham is dubious about the product: “Unless it’s cheaper or tastes better then I can’t see myself buying it. It doesn’t serve its purpose, carrying round alcohol isn’t a problem unless you’re taking it somewhere you shouldn’t be.”

The Future of Palcohol

Even though Phillips is still pushing for approval of Palcohol, Minnesota state Rep. Joe Atkins has now introduced a new legislation that would ban any sales of powdered alcohol and it seems other states such as Vermont are trying to do the same.

To find out more about Palcohol visit http://www.palcohol.com/home.html

Do you think Palcohol should be sold in our stores? Take our poll here:

What do the people of twitter think?

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